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Nothing Personal Pilot Issue.jpg
Nothing Personal Pilot Issue.jpg

EDITORIAL

LEAVING THE AULD TOON

THE MONROE EFFECT

 

THE LIMITS OF
SELF-ORIENTALISING

 

MUCH OF IT MEANS NOTHING

 

JANUS SEES THE GREYS AND THE BLUES BUT ALSO THE GREENS AND THE YELLOWS

 

CAMPUS

 

HOUSE OMELETTE

 

BERNADETTE MAYER’S MEMORY

 

reviews

MARC HUNDLEY, TMI

ROSS LITTLE, CCA

RENÈE HELÈNA BROWNE, BFMAF

Pilot Issue
£10

Writing, reviews and artworks by Neil Clements, Rosie Dowd-Smyth, Esther Draycott, Kiah Endelman Music, Maria Howard, Loll Jung, Rhett Leinster, Lindsey Jean McLean, Oliver McConnie, Aman Sandhu, Calum Sutherland, Swapnaa Tamhane, Julia Tulke.

 

Neil Clements’ Leaving The Auld Toon looks at Glasgow International’s relationship to the city, its biennial effects and mythology. Esther Draycott’s The Monroe Effect charts the downward pull of high rise buildings, asking what it means to be upstanding in a modern city. Swapnaa Tamhane’s essay inaugurates our The Limits of … column, defining and unpicking the limits and ironies of self-Orientalising. Kiah Endelman Music’s Much of it Means Nothing critiques the lack of meaningful care or action behind so-called ‘statements of commitment’ that art institutions seem to endlessly churn out. Loll Jung’s hybrid work Janus Sees the Greys and the Blues but also the Greens and the Yellows looks at beginnings and ends, reflecting an interest in boundaries and transitions found throughout the writing in this issue. In CAMPUS, Calum Sutherland draws a conceptual line between the Barclays Glasgow Campus and that of the Glasgow School of Art, considering the affect of inner-city infrastructure. The Metacritical is written by Aman Sandhu, who embraces the column’s aim to scrutinise rituals and methods of criticality used by artists, while considering the fallout from making, researching and invigilating his show NO MORE ARTISTS. Maria Howard begins our Writing Through feature with a piece that engages with the latest incarnation of Bernadette Mayer’s Memory, meditating on the life of an artwork and its potential to haunt and influence.